John Tinker Tinker V Des Moines

Bill of Rights: Real Life Scenarios. Secondary Sources "Tinker v. John and Mary Beth Tinker with current Des Moines area high school students. Kennedy's Christmas Truce. Decided February 24, 1969 (Minority Opinion) The Court's holding in this case ushers in what I deem to be an entirely new era in which the power to. Des Moines, the 1969 Supreme Court case in which the justices ruled 7-2 that students do not lose their First Amendment rights at school. John Tinker, who now lives in Fayette, created a free speech case that is still cited today. Supreme Court decisions. Des Moines. Des Moines School District. Des Moines (1969) In 1965, several Des Moines students decided to protest the Vietnam War by wearing black armbands to school. The Des Moines School District instituted its policy preventing the wearing of the armbands before the students came to school with them on. College students. It was a rare moment of surprise and drama Wednesday night inside the Supreme Court chamber. The group determined. 6 High School Lesson Plan: Freedom of Speech in Schools, First Amendment to the U. history textbooks. Tinker's case started when, at age 15, he wore a black arm band to school protesting the Vietnam War. This book is about students were suspended from school because the were werring black arm bands with the peace sighns on it to protest against the Vietnam War. The student's wore these armbands to support the return of all Vietnam warriors home for Christmas. John Tinker was first-named petitioner and a namesake of the U. The students protesting carried out their daily tasks as normal, and they themselves were not violent or disruptive. It was in 1969 that the U. Prior to giving students information about the outcome of Tinker v. There was still one more problem that Justice Black questioned, " Assuming that the Court is. Mary Beth Tinker, one of the students in the Tinker case, in 2014. Petitioner John F. The first amendment in the Bill of Rights gives Americans the freedoms of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. Feb 19 2015 Brief of respondents Morgan Hill Unified School District, et al. John and Mary Beth Tinker were siblings ages 15 and 13. In that case, the Supreme Court sided with John Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt, saying that the school could not prevent them from wearing armbands to protest the Vietnam War. In December 1965, Des Moines, Iowa residents John F. DES MOINES INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT Vertical Files (for use in-library only (Central), also available on microfilm): Breeding, Barbara. DES MOINES INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT Vertical Files (for use in-library only (Central), also available on microfilm): Breeding, Barbara. The Tinker V. Tinker (now a Missouri resident) v. Des Moines school District case where a number of students in the Des Moines decided to wear armbands to support for truce in the Vietnam War. Tinker’s case started when, at age 15, he wore a black arm band to school protesting the Vietnam War. Des Moines Independent Community School District, 393 U. Upon learning of their intentions, and fearing that. Nonetheless, their protests eventually culminated in the leading. This book adaptation of the lecture includes a deeper analysis of the irony in the legal stance taken by the ACLU,. An exhibit in the Newseum's Cox First Amendment Gallery features a photo of Mary Beth and John Tinker, and the actual armband worn by Mary Beth and her diary. IN SUPPORT OF TINKER V. Date Decided: Argued on November 12,. But in the 1960s, that changed with the Supreme Court case Tinker v. John Tinker: The Black Armband Story In the fall of 1965 I, along with several other public school students in Des Moines, Iowa, decided that we would wear black armbands to school to protest against the war in Vietnam. After the jump I've posted links about the case and some reflections on Eckhardt's role. Des Moines Independent School District (1969). Des Moine Essay Sample. Lookup public records including criminal records. Jan 03, 2018 · Students Identify With 50-Year-Old Supreme Court Case Teenagers in Washington, D. Mon Jan 06 2020 at 07:30 pm, Performances: Feb. 2d 731 (1969), the U. Des Moines Independent Community School District Dan L. Johnson] on Amazon. DES MOINES INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT 393 U. C-SPAN is continuing its second season of the series "Landmark Cases," about historic U. 3 The schools’ actions were challenged in federal court. In mid-December, 1965, at the time of the Vietnam war, a small group of young students in Des Moines, Iowa, decided to express their disagreement with their government's foreign policy in Vietnam and their support for a peace agreement. " in the United States is in ultimate effect transferred to the Supreme. According to The New York Times, Tinker v. Des Moines, a landmark case that clarified American students' freedom of speech and right to protest in schools. Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker, and Christopher Eckhart – were suspended from their respective schools for brandishing black armbands in protest of the Vietnam War. It was clear that there was no better topic that combined my passion for the law and the First Amendment. In 1965, a teenage Mary Beth Tinker made a stand for her First Amendment right to free speech by wearing a simple black armband. A summary and case brief of Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District. Des Moines affirmed the First Amendment rights of students in school. However, the school administrators of the Des Moines School District caught word of this plan and were able to put a policy into place, a policy that directly banned the wearing of armbands and warned that those who failed to comply would have. Petitioner Mary Beth Tinker, John's sister, was a 13-year-old student in junior high school. Respondent Des Moines Independent Community School District et al. public schools. The Tinkers won their case in a landmark 1969 decision, Tinker v. Bill of Rights Institute — Tinker v. The principle of the school thought it was disturbing, and decided to suspend the kids to after New Years Eve. may be the most important case from Iowa ever to reach the Supreme Court. Des Moines School District, where Tinker and the other plaintiffs prevailed. Petitioner Mary Beth Tinker, John's sister, was a 13-year-old student in junior high school. On March 14, 1966, the Iowa Civil Liberties Union filed a formal complaint on behalf of Christopher Eckhardt, John Tinker, his sister Mary Beth, and their fathers in the U. John Tinker, one of the co-petitioners in the Supreme Court case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969) (Referred to by Justice O'Connor) Background Facts: John Tinker, 15 years old, his sister Mary Beth Tinker, 13 years old, and Christopher Echardt, 16 years old, decided along with their parents to protest the Vietnam War by wearing black. The case involves 3 minors—John Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker and Christopher Eckhart—who were each suspended from their schools for wearing black armbands to protest the Vietnam War. The court ruled that students in public schools. com, find free presentations research about Tinker V Des Moines PPT. Harlan II each wrote dissenting opinions. The school board and principals adopted regulation that anyone wearing a black armband would be suspended from school for causing a disruption. Tinker Foundation. David Hudson brings this history vividly alive by drawing from interviews with key student litigants in famous cases, including John Tinker of Tinker v. Tinker, fifteen years old, his younger sister Mary Beth Tinker, thirteen years old, and their friend Christopher Eckhardt, sixteen years old. Name of the Case: Tinker V. This is an image of Vietnam protesters standing outside the White House protesting to have the troops sent home. Des Moines, high school and middle school students wore black armbands to protest the Vietnam War but were forced to take the bands off during the school day. Des Moines Independent Community School District. According to The New York Times, Tinker v. DesMoines (1969) Tags Christopher Eckhardt, DesMoines Independent School District, John Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker, Vietnam War. Des Moines : the right to protest in schools (Book). " Bill of Rights Institute Landmark Supreme Court Cases Tinker v Des Moines 1969 Comments. A presentation and discussion with Mary Beth and John Tinker. What was the Tinker vs. View Details Has Lived In: Orange, MA Burleson, TX West Des Moines, IA. In the 50 years since the Supreme Court recognized that students have freedom of speech and. In 1965, as the Vietnam War was underway, Mary Beth and John were exposed to the horrors of the violence that the war entailed. On November 12, 1968, the case of Tinker v. "Chris as a young boy joined his mother for speeches and meetings with various civil rights advocates who came to Des Moines including black Georgia politician Julian Bond, and John Howard Griffin, the author of 'Black Like Me'. Des Moines Independent Community School District MR. The Tinker case arose out of an era of social activism, a commitment to principle, and civil rights. He goes on to discuss the raging free-speech controversies in public schools today. In the Tinker V. Mary Beth Tinker and her brother John and others were suspended for wearing black armbands to mourn the dead on both sides of the Vietnam War and their case went to the Supreme Court. 503 (1969) Tinker v. Des Moines, set a standard for student free speech rights. She was suspended. Des Moines and the 1960s (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) (9780700608676) by John W. can defy and flout orders of school officials to keep their minds on their own schoolwork, it is the beginning of a new revolutionary era of permissiveness in this country fostered by the judiciary. The latest Tweets from JohnTinker (@JohnTinker): "https://t. Petitioner John F. In 1965, John Tinker, his sister Mary Beth, and a friend were sent home from school for wearing black. Des Moines School District. Case summary for Tinker v. Des Moines Essay - Separate but equal, judicial review, and the Miranda Rights are decisions made by the Supreme Court that have impacted the United States in history altering ways. John Tinker and his sister, Mary Beth, were petitioners in the landmark court case Tinker v. On February 24, 1969, the Supreme Court ruled in Tinker v. The event was held at the State Historical Museum in Des Moines on February 22, 2019, and aired on Iowa Public Television. By Samuel Liggett and Jack Groskreutz. 503 (1969) was a decision by the United States Supreme Court that defined the constitutional rights of students in U. Des Moines Independent Community School District. In his 1969 opinion in Tinker v. government class last year which taught me about the case, Tinker v Des Moines. MLA: Tinker v. It was this that led Mary Beth Tinker, John Tinker, and Christopher Eckhardt to join in the protest. Tinker and Mary Beth Tinker (minors), Leonard Tinker (adult); Plaintiff(s) - Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District et al. (Source: PBS. , were inspired by a recent lesson in the First Amendment rights of students after three federal judges and their. Shambaugh Award, Honorable Mention The tension between free speech and social stability has been a central concern throughout American history. John and Mary Beth Tinker, aged 13 and 16 respectively, attended public school in Des Moines, Iowa. The group determined. Des Moines. 503 (1969), including the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, key terms, and concurrences and dissents. The case involves 3 minors—John Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker and Christopher Eckhart—who were each suspended from their schools for wearing black armbands to protest the. Justice Fortas, writing for the majority opinion, stated that "It can hardly be argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate. SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. Mary Beth Tinker frequently talks with young people about the background of the story. Des Moines Independent School District,10 the following trio of cases shape the broad outline under which student expression is evaluated. Des Moines school principals discovered the plan. On December 16, Christopher Eckhardt and Beth Tinker wore their armbands to school and they were sent home. 503 (1969) Title: Tinker v. 9 Tinker vs. Their protests ended abruptly due to the school authorities policy of no armbands in school that suddenly came into effect. And on Monday, April 23, the series will feature Tinker v. Des Moines Schools Decision. Des Moines Independent Community School District. John is a LEED Accredited Professional and is dedicated to implementing sustainable solutions for a wide array of project types. Rights Thirty Years After Tinker v. like Tinker v. Kuhlmeier, 108 S. In this case, heard before the Supreme Court, two high school students (John Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt) and a junior high school student (Mary Tinker, John's sister) were suspended from their respective schools in. Des Moines that students do not lose their First Amendment rights on school grounds. They were not distracting anyone by wearing the armbands and should have been able to wear them to school. United States District Court S. He goes on to discuss the raging free-speech controversies in public schools. Mary Beth Tinker, John Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt had no idea their protest would be the catalyst to free expression in schools. The students protesting carried out their daily tasks as normal, and they themselves were not violent or disruptive. The Struggle for Student Rights: Tinker v. When school authorities asked that the Tinkers remove their armbands, they refused and were subsequently suspended. Tinker and Mary Beth Tinker, minors, by their father and next friend, Leonard Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt, minor, by his father and next friend, William Eckhardt v. Des Moines was a case that took place in 1969. Des Moine Essay Sample. Home In 1965, three Des Moines students-Mary Beth Tinker, 13, John Tinker, 15, and Christopher Eckhardt, 16-were brave enough to take a peaceful stand against an unpopular antiwar belief. Bill of Rights Institute — Tinker v. On Tuesday, Feb. Tinker, 15 years old, and petitioner Christopher Eckhardt, 16 years old, attended high schools in Des Moines, Iowa. Nearly 50 years ago, Tinker v. This is an image of Vietnam protesters standing outside the White House protesting to have the troops sent home. Mary Beth Tinker was a 13-year-old junior high school student in December 1965 when she and a group of students decided to wear black armbands to school to protest the war in Vietnam. Des Moines December of 1965, a group of adults and a few students of Des Moines Independent Community School District including John Tinker, Mary Beth and their friend Eckhard gathered to show they disfavor towards American involvement in the. , Des Moines IA 50311. Find current home address, cell phone numbers, email addresses and known relatives. Petitioner John F. Miele's class. Both sides will make opening statements, question witnesses, and make closing arguments. Tinker and Mary Beth Tinker, minors, etcetera et al. Mary Beth Tinker and Erik Jaffe talked about Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District – began after five suspended students, through their fathers, filed a complaint with the United States District Court. Des Moines Indpt. Des Moines Independent Community School District: | | | Tinker v. Kuhlmeier), and Dr. In December 1965, a group of adults and students in Des Moines held a meeting at the Eckhardt home. The district court ruled that the schools action did not violate the First Amendment, the students' lawyers took the case to the U. The case, Tinker v. 92 "If the time has come when pupils of state-supported schools. The students did not return to school until after the New Year, which was the original protest plan. com: The Struggle for Student Rights: Tinker v. This case decided whether public schools could ban political protests to maintain order or whether that would infringe on students' freedom of speech. Des Moines court case in 1969. Mary Beth Tinker, Tinker vs Des Moines Indep. (TIMES PAST 1969, Mary Beth and John Tinker , Interview) by "New York Times Upfront"; News, opinion and commentary General interest Activists Interviews Freedom of speech Laws, regulations and rules Social. At this year’s National Finals, guest speaker John Tinker of the landmark Supreme Court case Tinker v. Sources: Johnson, John W. It created the Tinker. org, February 22, 2019) John F. Thank you to our sponsors: American Civil Liberties Union, American Board of Trial Advocates - Iowa, Des Moines Public Schools,…. Tinker and Mary Beth Tinker, minors, by their father and next friend, Leonard Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt, minor, by his father and next friend, William Eckhardt v. In December 1965, a group of students and adults in DesMoines, Iowa, met to discuss ways of publicizing their opposition to the war in Vietnam and their support for a truce in the fighting. JUDGE: Please be seated. for an anti-war rally. Get this from a library! Tinker v. John and Mary Beth Tinker were petitioners forty-six years ago in Tinker v. Des Moines Podcast. 503 (1969), the Supreme Court ruled that public school officials cannot censor student expression unless they can reasonably forecast that the speech will substantially disrupt school activities or invade the rights of others. TINKER v DES MOINES (1969) In December 1965, at a meeting in Des Moines, Iowa, adults and students discussed how they could publicize their objections to U. By Samuel Liggett and Jack Groskreutz. 503 (1969) II. Respondent Des Moines Independent Community School District et al. The Tinker test, also known as the "substantial disruption" test, is still used by courts today to determine whether a school's interest to prevent disruption infringes upon students' First Amendment rights. Mary Beth Tinker, the plaintiff in the landmark ACLU case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District. And Des Moines being second means they are the. Des Moines Supreme Court case. In the landmark case of Tinker v. This month marks the 40th anniversary of the beginning of Tinker v. Tinker v Des Moines 1969. Tinker v Des Moines ISD declared that symbolic expression Question 36. The group included 15 year old high school student John Tinker, his sister, Mary Beth Tinker and his friend Christopher Eckhardt. When she refused, she was sent home. Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker, and Christopher Eckhart – were suspended from their respective schools for brandishing black armbands in protest of the Vietnam War. Des Moines The Background John Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker and Christopher Echardt wore black armbands to school in order to protest, along with their parents, the American involvement in the Vietnam War. The principals suspended John, Mary Beth, and Christopher, saying they couldn't come back to school unless they came not wearing the armbands. Citations: 393 U. The average John Tinker is around 61 years of age with around 57% falling in to the age group of 41-60. Des Moine Essay Sample. In the Supreme Court cases New Jersey v. Des Moines: Celebrating 50 years of free speech and student voices. Tinker and Mary Beth Tinker, minors, by their father and next friend, Leonard Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt, minor, by his father and next friend, William Eckhardt v. - Justice Abe Fortas, in Tinker v. These words written by U. Des Moines Independent Community School District. To commemorate the 50th anniversary in 2019 of Tinker v. Mary Beth Tinker, John's sister, was a 13-year-old student in junior high school. government class last year which taught me about the case, Tinker v Des Moines. , petitioners versus Des Moines Independent Community School District et al. Supreme Court case of "Tinker v. 2 The students were sent home and suspended until willing to attend school without the armbands. A few examples of this are Sons of Liberty, the Boston Tea Party, and the Supreme Court Case of Tinker V. Christopher Eckhardt and John Tinker attended a protest the previous month against the Vietnam War in Washington, D. In December 1965, a group of adults and students in Des Moines held a meeting at the Eckhardt home. Along with a friend, Christopher Eckhardt, then 16, they protested the Vietnam War by wearing a black armband with the peace symbol to school. District Court rule? , What is the importance of the Tinker vs Des Moines trial?. Knowing that they risked suspension. In 1965, three students of the Des Moines, Iowa school district, John F. As 10th-grader at a Des Moines, Iowa, high school in 1969, Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker and Chris Eckhardt decided to wear black armbands to school as a protest of the Vietnam War and were suspended. "Chris as a young boy joined his mother for speeches and meetings with various civil rights advocates who came to Des Moines including black Georgia politician Julian Bond, and John Howard Griffin, the author of 'Black Like Me'. Christopher Eckhardt (age 16), John F. Petitioner Mary Beth Tinker, John's sister, was a 13-year-old student in junior high school. (John and Mary Beth Tinker were part of the landmark Supreme Court case: Tinker v Des Moines Independent Community School District, 1969). On December 14, 1965, school officials adopted a policy that any student wearing an armband to school would be asked to remove it, and would be suspended if he or she refused to do so. JUDGE: Please be seated. He goes on to discuss the raging free-speech controversies in public schools. School Dist. The National Archives and Records Administration is the nation's record keeper. and Tinker v. freedom of religion 3. ground troops were deployed in Vietnam with the goal of overthrowing the. In December of 1965, John Tinker, his sister Mary Beth, and their friend Christo-pher Eckhardt decided to protest the war. Together with his sister and a friend, they successfully sued the Des Moines public school system for having violated their First Amendment rights. The decisions the Supreme Court makes change the course of US history and shape the country we live in. Petitioner John F. 2009 marks the 40th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court case, Tinker v. At a January 3, 1966 meeting, the school board voted 5-2 to uphold the principals' ban. Examines the 1969 Supreme Court case involving three public school students in Des Moines, Iowa and the Des Moines Community School District after the students were suspended from school for wearing black armbands to protest the government's policies in V. Des Moines, 1965. This title introduces readers to Tinker v.  School permitted students to wear political symbols, excluding armbands protesting the Vietnam War; Their parents sued the School. Represented by the ACLU, the students and their families embarked on a four-year court battle that culminated in the landmark Supreme Court decision: Tinker v. The hour-long session is free and open to the public. Last night we at FIRE learned of the sad passing of Chris Eckhardt, a plaintiff in the historic student speech case Tinker v. DES MOINES (1969) O ur story starts in the height of the Vietnam War, with a middle school girl by the name of Mary Beth Tinker and her older brother John Tinker. History 372, 378 (2014). John's sister Mary Beth was a junior high school students as well. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit resulted in a tie vote, leaving the rule in place. Des Moines Independent Community School District, to determine when public school officials may discipline students for their expression. Des Moines Independent Community School District 393 U. In his 1969 opinion in Tinker v. The student's wore these armbands to support the return of all Vietnam warriors home for Christmas. Des Moines, 1969, Facts of the case, para. John Tinker may refer to: John Joseph Tinker (1875-1957), British Labour Party Member of Parliament for Leigh 1923-1945; John Tinker (governor) (1700-1758), governor of the Bahamas 1741-1758; John Tinker, lead plaintiff in Tinker v. Supreme Court case on student. Reports on an interview with John Tinker of the "Tinker" case, which set the precedent for freedom of speech for students. Springfeild: Enslow, 1997. Opinion for Tinker v. Get the plugin now. Des Moines Independent Community School District, 393 U. Constitution. “Stand Up, Speak Up! Tinker v. PROCEDURAL POSTURE: Tinker students filed a complaint claiming violation of their First Amendment right to free speech, seeking an injunction and nominal damages. Des Moines Community Independent School District, the court ruled 7-2 to uphold the right of several students in Des Moines, Iowa, to wear black armbands in school to protest and draw. Des Moines Independent Community School District, 393 U.  School permitted students to wear political symbols, excluding armbands protesting the Vietnam War; Their parents sued the School. 503 (1969) Parties Involved in the Case John F. John Tinker's father. Tinker, 15 years old, and petitioner Christopher Eckhardt, 16 years old, attended high schools in Des Moines, Iowa. John and Mary Beth Tinker were public school students in Des Moines, Iowa in December of 1965. Des Moines Schools Decision An hour-long presentation and discussion with Mary Beth Tinker and John Tinker, hosted by Iowa Public Television. The Tinker V. Mary Beth Tinker was one of the plaintiffs in a landmark students' rights case called Tinker v. Tinker v Des Moines ISD declared that allegorical expression in some of its forms was adequate beneath the First Amendment was never adequate beneath the First Amendment was a anatomy of abomination and accordingly not protected might be banned by accompaniment law but not by an act of Congress 37. The students planned to wear black armbands to. In the Tinker v. John Tinker's father thought this was unfair that their children were singled out for wearing armbands while other students were allowed to wear other political symbols so he sent a complaint to the district court filed under Title 42 of the United States Code but the court dismissed it ("Tinker V. The Tinker V Des Moines case served as a reference for later cases involving schools violating students rights. The top city of residence is Nashville, followed by Harrison. The substantial disruption test is the major standard developed by the U. In December 1965, a group of adults and students in Des Moines held a meeting at the Eckhardt home. Des Moines Independent Community School District explained. The Des Moines School District instituted its policy preventing the wearing of the armbands before the students came to school with them on. Petitioner John F. Mary Beth Tinker, John's sister, was a 13-year-old student in junior high school. School Dist. The school board and principals adopted regulation that anyone wearing a black armband would be suspended from school for causing a disruption. Des Moines Independent Community School District. This case is the reason why the rights of students are outlined today. Mary Beth Tinker and John Tinker reflect on their early-age activism and their landmark case on its 50th anniversary for the Des Moines Register. Des Moines Independent Community School District case? In 1965 Mary Beth (13) Tinker and John Tinker (15), along with their friend Chris Eckhardt (16) and a few other students, were suspended from their Des Moines, Iowa schools for wearing black armbands in a peaceful protest of the Vietnam War. The group determined. Thank you to our sponsors: American Civil Liberties Union, American Board of Trial Advocates - Iowa, Des Moines Public Schools,…. Des Moines and the 1960s. 6 High School Lesson Plan: Freedom of Speech in Schools, First Amendment to the U. The court ruled that students in public schools. They wanted to show their support for a truce by wearing black armbands. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Learn tinker vs des moines with free interactive flashcards. Tinker will be located in Montgomery's New offices when they open later in 1996. Des Moines Independent Community School District came before the Supreme Court. The students protesting carried out their daily tasks as normal, and they themselves were not violent or disruptive. docx from ECON 4211 at Florida Virtual School. John Tinker Vs. Des Moines Independent Community School District that students at school retain their First Amendment right to free speech. In its decision, the High Court upheld the right to peacefully protest in government-operated schools. By late 1968, some 500,000 U. " - Excerpt from "The Struggle for Student Rights". Case Background. On December 16, Christopher Eckhardt and Beth Tinker wore their armbands to school and they were sent home. Tinker was suspended until the two week time period ended on New Years Eve in 1965. , petitioners versus Des Moines Independent Community School District et al. Later that year, Joan Baez led six hundred people in an antiwar demonstration in San Francisco. On December 16, 1965, three high school students in Des Moines, Iowa, conducted a peaceful protest by wearing black armbands to voice their opinions on the United States involvement in the Vietnam War. Petitioner Mary Beth Tinker, John's sister, was a 13-year-old student in junior high school. The LION’s blog Media Mayhem evaluates the implications and the legacy of the Tinker v. often referred to as the Tinker trilogy, formed the basis of student speech law prior to the holding in Morse. This is an image of Vietnam protesters standing outside the White House protesting to have the troops sent home. Tinker, 15 years old, and petitioner Christopher Eckhardt, 16 years old, attended high schools in Des Moines, Iowa.